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In a misguided AIDA in Newark, the Tenor left the stage in Act !, after he begged Alfredo Silipigni to stop conducting the opera. It was a long haul---and a relief when he was entombed w/Aida in the Finale.

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Playing Aida you understand what a great genius Verdi was. You can play it twice a week for years, and it’s still magic every night.

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✨✨✨

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Thank you for this. What a treat. A decades-long favourite and I was just contemplating that octave (+/-) jump as I work on an arrangement of The Trees on the Mountain, another fave from Susannah

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Awesome! I just put all of these pattens together myself!

Such a great piece - I loved singing that one :-)

Thank you for sharing πŸ™πŸΌ

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Jan 10, 2022Liked by Opera Daily

I came to opera late (in college when I started taking voice lessons) in the early 1980s. So I was learning about opera at the height of the careers of several great singers, and at the end of some others, Price one of them. I can still remember going home from school and telling family that I was commandeering the television/radio for the simulcast (remember those?) of her final performance of Aida at the Met (https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1985-01-05-ca-11655-story.html). What. An. Incredible. Evening. I still remember it 30+ years later (go to Google and start typing "leontyne price last" and "at the Met" is the second suggest search - it's still that frequently searched for) the thunderous final curtain (according to that LATimes articel 25 minutes in length).

In my mind she is our greatest Aida. I was also privileged to hear her in concert when I was in grad school at Florida State a few years later. The world has changed, and opera no less than other things, and I think "diva" is not a way we talk any longer about great singers (modern media, television, video, social media give us singers less remote than when their appearances were more rare and wonderous events). I mean diva in this sense: derived from the Italian noun diva, a female deity. The word once carried a sense of ability and bearing and it went beyond singing on a stage. Leontyne Price carried herself with an understanding of her ability, her place in the history of opera as a singer and a woman of color.

The Glenn Winters comments are terrific by the way. Warms my Music Theory heart.

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I couldn't agree more - the greatest Aida. The more I read, watch and listen to Leontyne, the more I love her. Her Leonora (Trovatore), Elvira (Ernani), Tosca....magical! Thank you for sharing these memories...

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And Forza del Destino and Don Carlos!! She really was the greatest Verdian of the last half of the 20th century (though not Traviata or Rigoletto -- a different kind of voice, a voice other than her voice, is needed for those roles). Let's say Middle-Period Verdi, perhaps? Oddly, a Google search finds only ONE recording of Otello (https://www.abebooks.com/Giuseppe-Verdi-Otello-2-Audio-CDs/30929068278/bd) though she recorded the Ave Maria multiple times (but then, she also recorded the Liebestod [cp. the Aria film soundtrack!], so that's a glorious thing). At one time Aprille Millo was her successor, and I remember hearing some very lovely Met broadcasts with Millo in title roles, then she sort of disappeared, sad to say.

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